Writing

Storyboard Catalogue Extract

Róisín’s paintings play with properties of form, colour and pattern to create illusory spaces inhabited by ambiguous objects in uncertain settings.

Paintings are made over the course of weeks and months during which time ideas of what is depicted changes many times.  Narratives come and go in the making.  They help to drive the work, acting as an armature to pin the paint on to.  A recognisable scenario is formed one day but the next day, formal reorganisation disregards that story.  The work is driven by an open-minded approach, shot through with great uncertainty and some fickleness.

4. Family History 66cm x 56cm
Family History, 2016, Oil and pencil on canvas, 56cm x 66cm (LH)

Trees in both of Roisin’s paintings for this show, appear to be illustrative or over-simplified.  They might also be a realistic representation of artificial, model or toy trees.  Perhaps not.  Two or more modes of representation often sit side by side on the same canvas.  Sometimes presentation is diagrammatic, dismantling the pretence of a natural landscape.

Colour temperature depicts recession in space but the same space contains objects that remain consistent in size, subverting any attempt at linear perspective.  A scale is dubious.  Objects and settings hint at the bird’s eye viewpoint but never completely commit to it. Appearances are not conclusive and ultimately, narrative, or lack of it, is left for an audience to decide.

Designed and published by Chinagraph Books in April 2017. http://www.chinagraphbooks.com

John Moore’s Painting Prize 2016 Catalogue Extract

Goofy Foot by Róisín Fogarty

8. Goofy Foot 2015
Goofy Foot, 2015, Oil on canvas, 81.5cm x 61cm

Goofy Foot combines imagery from an outdoor basketball court in Walworth, south London with a village skate park in Mid-Sussex.   Both are places that I visit frequently and I am often struck by similarities between children from these two locations, even though their wider surroundings can sometimes seem worlds apart.

I like looking at the mathematical structure and clear division of space within recreation grounds and playing fields.  These areas provide me with a readymade framework for observing colour at play within space.  There is something satisfying about the clearly defined contours of the ramps and the markings of the court as they delineate the distance, tracking perspective and cooling in hue.

As a painter, I enjoy the problem of using two dimensions to convey an experience of time and space in the physical world.  I find the dynamics of movement and the complexities of spatial awareness fascinating.  And I am intrigued by left-footedness, a genetic trait that might run in my family.

Excerpt from catalogue ISBN: 978-1-902700-55-7 Publisher: National Museums Liverpool

© Roisin Fogarty 2017 – Photography by Lucia Helenka (LH), Ben Deakin (BD)

 

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